Poems by Rumi_thegallerist.art

Rumi’s Poetry

” You are not a drop in the ocean. You are the entire ocean in a drop.” ~Rumi

Rumi (30 September 1207 – 17 December 1273), was a 13th-century Persian poet, faqih, Islamic scholar, theologian, and Sufi mystic originally from Greater Khorasan. Rumi’s influence transcends national borders and ethnic divisions: Iranians, Tajiks, Turks, Greeks, Pashtuns, other Central Asian Muslims, and the Muslims of the Indian subcontinent have greatly appreciated his spiritual legacy for the past seven centuries. His poems have been widely translated into many of the world’s languages and transposed into various formats.

❝VISIT THE SICK❞

Visit the sick, and you will heal yourself.
The ill person may be a Sufi master,
And your kindness will be repaid in wisdom.
Even if the sick person is your enemy,
You will still benefit,
For kindness has the power to transform
Sworn enemies into firm friends.
And if there is no healing of bad feeling,
There certainly will be less ill will,
Because kindness is the greatest of all balms.
~Rumi

❝THE ALCHEMY OF LOVE❞

You come to us from another world
From beyond the stars and void of space.
Transcendent, Pure, Of unimaginable beauty,
Bringing with you the essence of love
You transform all who are touched by you.
Mundane concerns, troubles, and sorrows dissolve in your presence,
Bringing joy to ruler and ruled
To peasant and king
You bewilder us with your grace.
All evils transform into goodness.
You are the master alchemist.
You light the fire of love in earth and sky
in heart and soul of every being.
Through your love existence and nonexistence merge.
All opposites unite.
All that is profane becomes sacred again.”
~Rumi

 

❝FIELDS OF GOLD❞

All the precious words
you and I have exchanged
have found their way
into the heart of the universe
One day they’ll pour on us
like whispering rain
helping us arise
from our roots again
~Rumi

 

❞My soul is from elsewhere, I’m sure of that, and I intend to end up there.❞ ~Rumi

 

❞WHEN I DIE❞

When I die,
when my coffin
is being taken out,
you must never think
I am missing this world.

Don’t shed any tears,
don’t lament or
feel sorry
I’m not falling
into a monster’s abyss.

When you see
my corpse is being carried,
don’t cry for my leaving
I’m not leaving,
I’m arriving at eternal love.

When you leave me
in the grave,
don’t say goodbye.
Remember a grave is
only a curtain
for the paradise behind.

You’ll only see me
descending into a grave.
Now watch me rise
how can there be an end
when the sun sets or
the moon goes down.

It looks like the end
it seems like a sunset,
but in reality it is a dawn
when the grave locks you up
that is when your soul is freed.

Have you ever seen
a seed fallen to earth
not rise with a new life?
Why should you doubt the rise
of a seed named human?

Have you ever seen
a bucket lowered into a well
coming back empty?
Why lament for a soul
when it can come back
like Joseph from the well.

When for the last time
you close your mouth,
your words and soul
will belong to the world of
no place no time.
~Rumi

 

❞HEART❞

“My heart is so small
it’s almost invisible.
How can You place
such big sorrows in it?
“Look,” He answered,
“your eyes are even smaller,
yet they behold the world.”
~Rumi

Kuan Yin-Goddess of Mercy

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