Vicente Romero Redondo

Vicente Romero Redondo (Vicente Romero, born in Madrid, 1956) is a Spanish figurative painter and educator, best known for his pastel depictions of graceful girls at solitary moments in romantic surroundings, adorned in crafty clothing.

Having resided on the Costa Brava for years, his oeuvre has been praised for conveying rare beauty and serenity, while taking after the vivid luminosity distinctively seen in the art of native mediterranean masters. Romero’s oeuvre has been exhibited with honors across borders in Europe and beyond. Raised in an art loving family, Romero took an early interest in drawing and sketching at school. At 19 he enrolled at San Fernando Faculty of Fine Arts in Madrid where he graduated as a “Licenciado” in sculpture in 1982.

For several years he worked as a nomad street portraitist along coastal locations on the Spanish peninsula and islands while self-learning and further developing his plastic expression skills, until finally adopting pastel as his most favoured medium. Romero settled on Calonge, Costa Brava in 1987 where his art matured to his present luminous mediterranean style.

Kuan Yin-Goddess of Mercy

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Idealism and Theory of the Forms


Idealism and Theory of the Forms

One of the questions that has faced and continues to face some of the philosophers of the world is ‘What is reality?’ Plato addresses this question in his doctrine, the Theory of Forms. In an attempt to answer this question, he explains what the Forms are and how they affect the way the world is observed. These so-called Forms are the basis of the reality we perceive. The question one must ask him or her self is what are these forms, where do they come from, and how do they affect us as a society.’ A Platonic Form (Idea) is not a thought in someone’s mind but something that exists per se as an immutable part of the structure of reality.’

Allegory of the cave
This statement is the foundation of Plato’s philosophy. He believed that besides the material world we live in and of which we experience; there is another world, an eternal world of concepts, or Forms. This eternal world is more real than the world we experience through the senses (or Empirical knowledge – knowledge based on our senses), and it is the object of knowledge, pure knowledge, not opinion. What Plato means by the Forms is that they are the essential archetypes of things, having an eternal existence, apprehended by the mind, not the senses, for it is the mind that beholds “real existence, colorless, formless, and intangible, they are behind the way we see the world. In other words, they control the images and ideas that are presented to us.

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